The Teaching of Hazrat Inayat Khan      

Volume

Sayings

Social Gathekas

Religious Gathekas

The Message Papers

The Healing Papers

Vol. 1, The Way of Illumination

Vol. 1, The Inner Life

Vol. 1, The Soul, Whence And Whither?

Vol. 1, The Purpose of Life

Vol. 2, The Mysticism of Sound and Music

Vol. 2, The Mysticism of Sound

Vol. 2, Cosmic Language

Vol. 2, The Power of the Word

Vol. 3, Education

Vol. 3, Life's Creative Forces: Rasa Shastra

Vol. 3, Character and Personality

Vol. 4, Healing And The Mind World

Vol. 4, Mental Purification

Vol. 4, The Mind-World

Vol. 5, A Sufi Message Of Spiritual Liberty

Vol. 5, Aqibat, Life After Death

Vol. 5, The Phenomenon of the Soul

Vol. 5, Love, Human and Divine

Vol. 5, Pearls from the Ocean Unseen

Vol. 5, Metaphysics, The Experience of the Soul Through the Different Planes of Existence

Vol. 6, The Alchemy of Happiness

Vol. 7, In an Eastern Rose Garden

Vol. 8, Health and Order of Body and Mind

Vol. 8, The Privilege of Being Human

Vol. 8a, Sufi Teachings

Vol. 9, The Unity of Religious Ideals

Vol. 10, Sufi Mysticism

Vol. 10, The Path of Initiation and Discipleship

Vol. 10, Sufi Poetry

Vol. 10, Art: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

Vol. 10, The Problem of the Day

Vol. 11, Philosophy

Vol. 11, Psychology

Vol. 11, Mysticism in Life

Vol. 12, The Vision of God and Man

Vol. 12, Confessions: Autobiographical Essays of Hazat Inayat Khan

Vol. 12, Four Plays

Vol. 13, Gathas

Vol. 14, The Smiling Forehead

By Date

THE SUPPLEMENTARY PAPERS

Heading

Health

Physical Condition

Physical Culture

Control of the Body

Balance

Balance in Solitude

Balance in Greatness

Life's Mechanism

Harmony

Mastery

Self-Mastery

Self-Discipline

A Question about Fasting

Self-Control

Physical Control

Questions about Vaccination and Inoculation

Breath

The Mystery of Breath

The Science of Breath

The Philosophy of Breath

The Control of the Breath

The Control of the Breath

The Power of Silence

A Question about Feelings

The Control of the Mind

The Mystery of Sleep

Five Stages of Consciousness

Dreams

Dreams are of Three Kinds

Spiritual Healing

Sub-Heading

-ALL-

Vol. 8, Health and Order of Body and Mind

Balance in Greatness

One way of being great is to take all we can. The more we take the greater we become, and all the world will call us great. Another way is to give all we can. In the Bible we read, "If a man takes away your coat give him your cloak as well."

The question arises: How much can we give? The more we give the more will be taken from us. When Shams-i-Tabriz had given his skin, the worms and germs also took his flesh and blood. They did not say, "This man has given his skin, let him have the comfort that he may still have"; they took all.

We who are giving the message of liberty cannot give a message from which the world will run away. If we say, "Give all", the world will run away from such a message. The world will say, "Ill give all, I shall have nothing to eat, I shall have nothing with which to cover myself. I must at least have something to eat and I must be covered."

There is a story told of our Murshid Farid Shakr Ganj who was worshipping in the jungle. His way of worship was the ascetic way; he hung himself up in a well by his feet, head down, and in this way he practiced. The animals did not come near him, but the birds came and ate his skin and his flesh. He let them eat, because he was practicing this moral, but when they came near his eyes he warded them off with his hand and said, "O bird, I would also give thee mine eyes, if thou wouldst bring them first in the presence of the Beloved, that they might have a glimpse. Then thou couldst eat."

We must not give away the soul, the intelligence, the power of distinguishing. If we give these, we are like the tree: everyone may eat its fruits. Our arms were not given to us that we should fold them, but that we should work; our feet were not given to us that we should be motionless, but that we should walk. Our power of distinguishing is given to us that we may distinguish, and by distinguishing we also may learn not to distinguish. We must take a middle course: we must distinguish when to give, when not to give, to whom to give, to whom not to give.